Rev. Alexander  Peden, 

 Alexander  Peden  was born  about  1626 in  the  house  of  Auchincloich  in  the  northern  part  of  the  Parish  of  Sorn, Ayrshire. He  was  the  eldest  son  and  heir  to  his  father  a  small  proprietor  of  land  who by  the  standards  of  the  day was  quite  well  off. Thus  the  young  Alexander  received  a  good  education   - a scholar  of  the  University  of  Glasgow, and  mixed  freely  among  the  gentlemen  of  the  county  which  included  the  Boswell  family  of  Auchinleck. But  despite  these  advantages  he  chose  a  lifetime  of  loneliness  and  poverty.

 For  a  while  Peden  was  a  teacher  in  Tarbolton  during  which  time  he  was  falsely  accused  of  wronging  a  woman. He  was  at  risk  of  being  excommunicated  when  evidence  was  produced  of  his  innocence  but  the  experience  left  a  scar  and  may  well  be  the  reason  why  he  never  married.  Peden`s  next  step  was , in 1659,  to  seek  ordination  into  the  church  and  no  less  than  five  times  appeared  before  the  Presbytery  of  Lanark  and  Biggar  before  his  licence  was  granted. He  was  ordained  and  appointed  to  the parish  of  New  Luce  in  Galloway  but  his  stay  was  brief  as  in  1663  along  with  so  many  other  ministers, he  was  compelled  to  leave  the  church.  Thus  began  twenty  three  years of wandering  the  hills  and  moors  of  South West  Scotland  from  the  Clyde, through  Renfrewshire, his  homeland  of  Ayrshire  into  the  depths  of  Dumfries  and  Galloway , and  across  the  Irish  Sea  in  Ulster  where  he  preached  at  Kells  and  Glenwherry, Co  Antrim  between  1679  and  1681  and  made  later  visits  in 1682  and  1684.

 He  was  undoubtedly  a  gifted  preacher  and would  present  his sermon  in  homely  ways, that  the  populace  could  understand.  His  manner  of  delivering  a  sermon  with the  occasional  halt  and  aside  discussion  with  an  unseen  third  party ,  or  an  apparent  conversation  aside with  God, added  to  his  reputation. A  vivid  speaker  he  was  credited  with  almost  supernatural  powers  because  he  almost  routinely  escaped  the  soldiers  seeking  him  out. Not  only  did  he  escape  pursuers  many  times  but  it  was  on  occasion  because  of swirling  mists  and  sudden  severe  weather  cloaking  him  from the  dragoons, thus  adding  to  his  mystique. A  shrewd  assessor  of  his  fellow  man  and  the  issues  that  beset  the  Covenanters  gave  meaning to  his  reputation  as  a  prophet  although  his  forecasts  were more likely the  result  of  keen  observation of men, politics and  a wisdom garnered over many years of strife.  Among his  prophesies  were  that  at  Rullion  Green  and  Bothwell  Brig   “ the  saints  will  be  broken, killed, taken  and  fled  “

 A  well  known  prophecy  of  Peden`s  concerned   John  Brown, known  as  “The  Christian  Carrier “  who  on 1 May 1685   refused  to  take  the  Abjuration  Oath,  and  a  search  of  his  home  revealed  treasonable  papers  and  weapons. He  was  condemned  on  the  spot  by  Claverhouse and  shot  in  front  of  his  wife, Isabel Weir, and  children  fulfilling  a  prophecy  that  Peden  had  made  in  1682  when  he  had  married  them.  At  that  time  he  said:

 “You  have a good  man  to  be  your  husband , but  you  will  not enjoy him long; prize his  company, and keep linen by you to be his winding sheet, for you will need it when ye are not looking for it, and it will be a bloody one “

 The  tale  is  told  of  a  trip  to  Ulster  and  County Antrim in 1682  where  he  took  work  threshing  corn  for  local farmer  William  Stiel  at  Glenwherry,  thereby  gaining  a  modest  wage, a  bed  in  the  barn but  also  time  to  think  and  pray. However, a  servant  told  of  his  praying  and  he  was  obliged  to  reveal  his  identity  only  to  be  received  into the house as  an  honoured  guest by  the  farmer and his  family.  On  another  occasion  he  displayed  a  brave  recklessness  by  escaping  from  pursuing  dragoons  by  plunging  into  an icy  river  in  spate, leaving  the  pursuers  on  the  far  shore  afraid  to  take  the  plunge.  In  yet  another  incident  he  and  his  party  were  chased  by  dragoons  when , it  is  said, Peden  prayed  for  help  and  a  thick  mist  descended  under  cover  of  which  they  escaped

Howie, in Scots Worthies describes the event thus:

"Let us pray here , for if the Lord hear not our prayers and save us , we are all dead men.... "Lord it is Thy enemy`s day, hour and power;they may not be idle. But hast Thou no other work for them but to send them after us ? Send them after them  to whom Thou wiltt give strength to flee, for our strength is gone. Twine them about the hill, Lord, and cast  the lap of Thy cloak over Old Sandy, and thir poor things, and save us this one time; and we`ll keep it in remembrance, and tell it to the commendation of Thy goodness, pity and compassion, what Thou didst for us at such a time."

 Whether  Divine  Providence  or  not, tales  such  as  these  soon  became  lore  and  gained  for  Peden  a  reputation  which  of  itself  concerned  the  authorities  who  feared  the  power and  influence  he  exercised.  This  was  enhanced  by  the  fact  that  Peden  often  used  a  curious  mask  to  disguise  himself  in  his  travels  during  The  Killing  Time. Very  crude  by  today`s  standards  the  mask  is  made  of  leather, with  real  teeth  fixed  in  the  mouth  and  human  hair  attached  to  the  forehead  but  in  the  days  of  flickering lamps  and  candles  it  must  have  served  its  purpose. The  mask  is  today  in  the  National  Museum  of  Scotland , Edinburgh,  as  is  Peden`s  well  thumbed  Bible.

 He  was  not  directly  involved  in  the  Pentland  Rising  in 1666 but  good  fortune  ran  out  in June  1673  when  he  was  captured  while  holding  a  conventicle at  Knockdow, near  Ballantrae  in  South Ayrshire.  He  was  brought  before  the  Privy  Council  and  sentenced  to imprisonment  on  the  Bass  Rock  where  he  was  held  for  four  years  and  three  months - until  October 1677.  From  the  Bass  Rock  he  was  moved  to  the  Tolbooth in  Edinburgh  where  he  spent  another  eighteen  months.  In  December  1678  he, with  sixty  seven others, was  sentenced  to  banishment  and  put on  board  the “St Michael “ to be  taken  to  Virginia. This  scene  of  another  glimpse  into  the  future, when Peden  prayed  on  behalf  of  a  fellow  deportee  James  Law 

“ lord, let  not  James  Law`s wife  miss  her  husband, until  thou  return  him to her  in peace and safety, which  we  are  sure  will  be  sooner  than  either  he  or  she  is  looking  for." 

 On  board  ship  Peden  also  reassured  his  fellows  that

 “ If we were  once  in  London we will all  be  set  at  liberty “

  In the event, the  ship  was  delayed  five  days  and  when it put  into  London  there  was  nobody  to  receive  them. The  captain  who  was  to  take  them  to  Virginia  refused  to  take  them  when  he  found  out  that  they  were  good  Christians,  and  not  the  thieves  and  vagabonds  he  had  believed  were to be transported. At  this  the  captain of  the St Michael  declined to  provision his sixty  prisoners,  and  put  them  ashore. Thus  freed they  were  treated  well  by  the people  of  Gravesend and  most  of  the  prisoners  made  their  way  back to Scotland; and  fulfilling  yet  another  Peden  prophesy .

  Peden  returned  to  Scotland  where  for  the  next  seven  years  he  divided  his  time  between  Scotland  and  Ulster going as  he  called  it  “ from one bloody  land  to  the other  bloody  land“  He  returned  for  the  last  time  in  February 1685. Peden  was  not  in  fact  a  Cameronian  although  he  was  as  severe  a  critic as  any  of  the  government  and  prelacy , and  supported  the  Duke  of  Argyll`s  rebellion  to  remove  a  Popish  king  from the throne. For many  years  he  and  James  Renwick, the leader of the Cameronians after the death of Richard Cameron at Ayrsmoss, held  each  other  in  respect  even  though  of  differing  opinions  on  some  matters, and were reconciled  as  Peden  lay  upon  his  death bed.

 The  end  came  for  Peden  on 6  January  1686* after  he  had  returned  to  his  brother`s  home  at   Ten Shilling Side, Auchinleck.. There  was  a  concealed  cave  nearby  to  which  Peden  would  retire  at  night.  Two  days  before  he  died  he  left  the  cave  and  went  to  his  brother`s house   where  his  sister in law  remonstrated  with  him  insisting  that he  return  to the safety  of the cave. Peden  refused  saying

 “  I have done  with  that  for  it  is  discovered. But there is no matter , for  within forty eight hours I will be beyond  the reach of all the devils` temptations  and his instruments in hell and on earth, and they shall trouble  me no more.  “

Within  three  hours  the  troopers  came  and  found  the  cave  but  not  Peden who  hid  in a pile of  straw. After  the  soldiers  had  gone away  Peden  told  his  friends  to  bury  him  where  they  would, and prophesied  he would be lifted again; within in a few  hours he  died.

 As  he  had  foretold, there was  no peace  for  him  in  death as  the  government  continued  to  hound  him.  The  Boswell  family  were  so  concerned  for  his  body  that  they  had  it  re interred  secretly  in  their  family  vault. But some forty  days  after  he  had died,  and despite  protests  of  the  Boswell family and  the  Countess of Dumfries, soldiers  took  the  body  to  the place of  execution,  a  hill  above  Cumnock , and  hung  it on  the gibbet.  When  it  was  eventually  cut  down  the  body  was  buried  again, this  time  at  the  foot  of  the  gibbet  as  if  a  common  criminal.  Time  has  been  a  great  healer  for little  by  little the  local  people buried  their  loved  ones  alongside  Alexander Peden  thus  creating  a  new  and  hallowed  graveyard.

In  1891  a  monument  paid  for  by  public  subscription  was  erected with the following  inscription

In Memory
of
ALEXANDER PEDEN
[ A native of Sorn ]

 THAT FAITHFUL MINISTER OF CHRIST,WHO.
FOR HIS UNFLINCHING ADHERENCE  TO THE
COVENANTED REFORMATION IN SCOTLAND,WAS
EXPELLED BY TYRANT RULERS FROM HIS PARISH
OF NEW LUCE,IMPRISONED FOR YEARS ON THE
BASS ROCK BY HIS PERSECUTORS,AND HUNTED
 FOR HIS LIFE ON THE SURROUNDING MOUNTAINS
AND MOORS, TILL HIS DEATH ON 26TH JANUARY 1686*
IN THE 60TH YEAR OF HIS AGE, AND HERE
AT LAST , HIS DUST REPOSES IN PEACE,AWAITING
THE RESURRECTION OF THE JUST
SUCH WERE THE MEN THESE HILLS  WHO TRODE
STRONG IN THE LOVE AND FEAR OF GOD
DEFYING THROUGH THE LONG DARK HOUR,
ALIKE THE CRAFT AND RAGE OF POWER.

 ERECTED
IN
1891.

* The Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticanae, H Scott (1915) Addenda vol 8 p 190 , amends date from 26 to 6 January 1686.

Peden at the Grave of Cameron ( Mrs A Stuart Menteath)

 

Home Scottish Reformation The Covenanters Ulster Scots English Reformation European Reformation General Topics & Glossary My Books & Bibliography Contact